The Parable of the Good Samaritan

Are we the good Samaritan? Or the robber?

Are we the good Samaritan? Or the robber?

Are we the good Samaritan? Or the robber? We are all one or the other. There’s no saying that we’ve never been in the scenario Jesus painted. Because we’re in. Right now. Every. Single. one. of. us. Everyone!

Are we the good Samaritan? Or the robber?
Look at the image. Are we the child? Or are we the person responsible for the man being on the bench?

In other words, are we the Good Samaritan? Or the Robber?

And did you notice the image of the person on the wall?

Should Christians be concerned about healthcare for the poor?

Should Christians be concerned about healthcare for the poor?

Should Christians be concerned about healthcare for the poor?  Of course, the answer is yes.  Isn’t it?  In theory, it’s hard to argue against the idea.  However, in practice, it’s apparently very easy to just ignore it.  Does that sound familiar?  If you’re Christian, it should resonate, loud and clear.  Even if you’re not Christian, chances are you know something about “the good Samaritan”.  Even if you don’t know where it came from, that concept is known by all sorts of people.

So let’s look at the question of healthcare for the poor in that light.  We’ll see what Jesus says on the topic.  After all, Jesus was the One who first put forth the idea of the good Samaritan.  And then we’ll see what happens today.  How we went from what Jesus taught, to a scenario where that’s pretty much impossible for all but the extremely wealthy people in the world, and how too many Christians have done the unneighborly thing by, well, by doing what we do.  We’ll look at that in a moment.

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