Do brain waves of a dying person show we’re in Heaven?

Do the brain waves of a dying person show we’re in Heaven? We often read of near-death experiences people have. Some are real. Some are made up. Usually, people talk of bright lights, good memories, and a feeling of calmness. But, apparently for the first time, there is scientific/medical evidence that claims to show these near-death experiences are true. However, are they really?

Do brain waves of a dying person show we're in Heaven?

Of course, we all have a different idea of what’s calm. Some of you, like me, think the adjacent image is calm. Others won’t.

But apparently, with brain waves, it’s not the specific picture in our minds, it’s the feeling of calm.

But the real questions with the study that was done are these.

What are the memories really about?

And is that sense of calmness permanent, or it is the proverbial “calm before the storm”?

They are incredibly important questions. Ones that we should think about before we get close to the point of our death. Especially since we don’t always have time to consider them at the time of our death. After all, in the end, we don’t know when the end will come, do we? It could come in the blink of an eye. And then there’s no chance to consider what other peoples’ near-death experiences meant.

The brain waves of a dying person

My reference for this article iss titled The Brain Waves of a Dying Person Have Been Recorded in Detail For The First Time. It’s from the health section of sciencealert.com. The story starts with:

People who have looked their mortality in the face often describe their near-death experiences in surprisingly similar terms – vivid recollection of memories, a sense of standing outside of their body, bright lights, or a feeling of tranquility.

That’s something most of us have probably read. No surprises there. However, there were never opportunities to gather brain wave data to examine the phenomena people describe in their near-death experiences. Plus, as I pointed out, some of the people have later admitted they made up the whole thing. As the science alert article continues:

While there is plenty of anecdotal evidence from people who have had near-death experiences (NDEs), scientists have little to no data on what happens in the brain as people transition into death. However, under tragic circumstances, scientists have collected the first continuous data on the neural dynamics of the brain during death. 

When an 87-year-old patient developed seizures after receiving surgery due to a fall, doctors used electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor his condition; unfortunately, the patient deteriorated and sadly passed away while these recordings were taking place.

Under that scenario, they were able to measure brain wave activity, Without getting into all the science of it, here’s the summary of what they found. If you are interested in the science behind it, hopefully the link above is still active when you read this.

“We measured 900 seconds of brain activity around the time of death and set a specific focus to investigate what happened in the 30 seconds before and after the heart stopped beating,” says Ajmal Zemmar, a neurosurgeon at the University of Louisville, US.

“Just before and after the heart stopped working, we saw changes in a specific band of neural oscillations, so-called gamma oscillations, but also in others such as delta, theta, alpha and beta oscillations.”

“Given that cross-coupling between alpha and gamma activity is involved in cognitive processes and memory recall in healthy subjects, it is intriguing to speculate that such activity could support a last ‘recall of life’ that may take place in the near-death state,” the team writes.

Despite these limitations, the team’s findings do point to a potential link between brain waves observed during death with the phenomenological experiences of NDEs, where participants describe their life flashing before their eyes.

… 

Their ultimate conclusion is:

Although researching what happens to the brain during death can be difficult, especially when patients leave behind distraught family members, Zemmar takes some comfort in the idea that our brains may immerse us in our most beloved memories while we leave the world. 

“Something we may learn from this research is: although our loved ones have their eyes closed and are ready to leave us to rest, their brains may be replaying some of the nicest moments they experienced in their lives.”

That’s all well and good. It gives those grieving for their lost loved ones a sense of comfort. Security even. But, is it a false sense of security?

Do brain waves of a dying person show we’re in Heaven?

The key to that question is how these near-death experiences and the recorded brain waves show we’re in Heaven. At least, that’s the conclusion above. However, the key for me is if these near-death experiences and the recorded brain waves show we’re in Heaven.

I’m sorry if my conclusion pops some bubbles. And yet, maybe I’m not sorry. It’s better to have them popped now, than to find out after it’s too late. I believe that. contrary to what we want to think, like to think, and want to be true, the Bible tells us those feelings and the brain waves don’t necessarily tell us what we think they do.

A lose-lose scenario

Ultimately, I believe the wish for everyone to go to Heaven is a lose-lose scenario. Here’s why.

  • Let’s say we want Heaven to be a better place. That’s obvious, even if we don’t want to admit it, by the feelings of extreme peace and calmness in the near-death experiences. But, at the same time, we think, no matter what people believed about God, about even trying to be better in this life, everyone goes to Heaven. This doesn’t make any sense. If we don’t want to change who we are, how can we feel peaceful and calm in a place where everyone is “good”?
    • For instance, the Bible has clear guidelines when it comes to various things related to sex. How can someone who flaunts those rules, says they’re wrong, and does whatever they want in this life, actually want to go to a place where the rules are willingly followed by everyone there?
    • Or if we loved making lots of money, taking advantage of everyone and everything along the way, how can we want to go to a place where the people there were interested in caring for the poor, the widows, children, people of all colors, races, and nationalities? All of those things are commanded by God in the Bible. Why does someone who refused to do these things in this short life want to be around people who thought they were important?
    • I could go on, but I hope you get the point. If you like this life, as it is, then you won’t like Heaven!
  • On the flip side, let’s say we don’t want Heaven to be a better place. As proposed above, we like this life. And we want eternity to be just like it. The problem with this scenario is that we don’t get to decide what Heaven is like!
    • God gave us the free will to make this earth, this life, into what we wanted it to be. And let’s face, it, it’s not good. That’s why there’s so much crime, so many poor people, so many people dying of starvation, and sickness. And while I’m listening to BBC reporting on Russia invading Ukraine, let’s not forget about war and the toll it takes on both the living and the dead.
    • However, God does not, and will not, give us the free will to turn Heaven into what we want it to be. Heaven is what God wants it to be. Entrance into Heaven is based on, believe it or not, wanting to be there, as God decreed it will be. It’s simple, really.
      • God told us what Heaven is like. We can take it or leave it.
      • And if we want to take it, God also told us how to enter Heaven. We can also take or leave that.

Maybe it’s too simple for us to believe. And yet, there it is.

If not necessarily Heaven, then what do these brain waves show?

Notice, the heading says – If not necessarily Heaven, then what do these brain waves show? Here’s why I include necessarily Heaven. The truth is, I think we really do go to Heaven when we die. The real question is, will we stay there?

The Sheep and the Goats

Do you remember when Jesus spoke of the sheep and the goats? Let’s go through it, and consider some things you maybe never thought of before.

The Sheep and the Goats

Mt 25:31 “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit on his throne in heavenly glory. 32 All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate the people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 He will put the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.

This is something everyone goes through. Every single one of us. No matter where our eternal destination is. The worst people who ever lived, or will live, go through this. In Heaven! Don’t believe it? Let’s follow through with the evidence.

One thing to consider before we start. The Bible talks about judgment being a single event, to take place at the end of history. In other words, at the end of time. However, we must consider something about “time”. Yes, we live in time. And yet, the Bible clearly says that God does not operate “in time”. God is always eternal, and doesn’t experience time like we do. So the idea that everything in the Bible, including the events in Revelation, must complete before even a single person is judged may be a limitation because of the understanding of the people at that time.

One event in the Bible that brings up this line of thinking is what we call the Transfiguration of Jesus. Without getting into the details of what happened, let’s look at it. Here’s Luke’s recording of, since it’s the shortest but still shows what I want to look at. Notice especially the underlined verses.

The Transfiguration – Luke

9:28-36 pp — Mt 17:1-8; Mk 9:2-8

Lk 9:28 About eight days after Jesus said this, he took Peter, John and James with him and went up onto a mountain to pray. 29 As he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became as bright as a flash of lightning. 30 Two men, Moses and Elijah, 31 appeared in glorious splendor, talking with Jesus. They spoke about his departure, which he was about to bring to fulfillment at Jerusalem. 32 Peter and his companions were very sleepy, but when they became fully awake, they saw his glory and the two men standing with him. 33 As the men were leaving Jesus, Peter said to him, “Master, it is good for us to be here. Let us put up three shelters—one for you, one for Moses and one for Elijah.” (He did not know what he was saying.)

Lk 9:34 While he was speaking, a cloud appeared and enveloped them, and they were afraid as they entered the cloud. 35 A voice came from the cloud, saying, “This is my Son, whom I have chosen; listen to him.” 36 When the voice had spoken, they found that Jesus was alone. The disciples kept this to themselves, and told no one at that time what they had seen.

Moses, Elijah, and Jesus together

Here’s a question for you. If Moses and Elijah didn’t go through the judgment yet, were not in Heaven yet, don’t you think there would be questions about what’s going on? Instead, they were talking about Jesus’ upcoming death on the cross to bring fulfillment to the various prophecies in the Old Testament. Some of those prophecies were made by the two of them.

This seems to indicate that judgment isn’t necessarily at the end of time for literally everybody. For instance, the Population Reference Bureau estimates that about 117 billion people have lived over the course of human history. Now, their number goes back over 190,000 years. That’s much earlier than the number of years estimated for Biblical times. However, the number is very much usable, since they also report that only 0.1% of the people ever born were from 8,000 BCE or earlier. The number goes up marginally to 0.5% at the year 1 CE. Something that has much more impact on their number is that they also estimate births out to the year 2050. In any case, that’s a lot of people to be judged at one time. Not that God can’t do it, but it does add some credence to the “we’re in time versus God’s not in our time” way of looking at judgment.

Jesus, the other men on the cross, and paradise

Let’s turn to another scene in the Bible. This one is where Jesus tells one of the two men on the crosses with them something about his future. Again, with no other details, here is the passage. The part for today’s topic is at the end, underlined.

The Crucifixion – Luke

23:33-43 pp — Mt 27:33-44; Mk 15:22-32; Jn 19:17-24

Lk 23:26 As they led him away, they seized Simon from Cyrene, who was on his way in from the country, and put the cross on him and made him carry it behind Jesus. 27 A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. 28 Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children. 29 For the time will come when you will say, ‘Blessed are the barren women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ 30 Then
“ ‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!”
and to the hills, “Cover us!” ’ 31 For if men do these things when the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?”

Lk 23:32 Two other men, both criminals, were also led out with him to be executed. 33 When they came to the place called the Skull, there they crucified him, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left. 34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.

Lk 23:35 The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him. They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Christ of God, the Chosen One.”

Lk 23:36 The soldiers also came up and mocked him. They offered him wine vinegar 37 and said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.”

Lk 23:38 There was a written notice above him, which read: THIS IS THE KING OF THE JEWS.

Lk 23:39 One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: “Aren’t you the Christ? Save yourself and us!”

Lk 23:40 But the other criminal rebuked him. “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence? 41 We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.”

Lk 23:42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.’”

Lk 23:43 Jesus answered him, “I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise.”

Yes, Jesus told one of them, today you will be with me in paradise. There are two questions to ask about that statement. First, exactly when is “today”? Second, where/what is “paradise”? Let’s check out both of them.

In Jesus’ statement, when is “today”?

After all this talk about time for us humans versus eternal time, what did Jesus mean by “today”, when he told one of the people on the cross next to Him, “I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise”?

It would take many pages to include all the different interpretations of this word by various commentators. They are literally all over the place. Here’s one that I find interesting, in that it’s fairly common, in my experience. Note – I modified the format, putting it in lists, to make it clearer, but the words are unchanged.

What happens when we die?


WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU DIE?

The Scripture basically uses three words to describe the state of the dead:

        1. Sheol, which refers to a state or place of the dead, sometimes with the element of misery;
        2. Hades, which refers to the invisible world of departed spirits; and
        3. Paradise, which refers to a park or garden.

The Scriptures teach us that:

        • At death the souls of the righteous go immediately into the presence of Christ and of God.
        • At death the souls of the wicked are banished from the presence of the Lord.

        • The souls of the departed exist in a state of consciousness.
          • The righteous dead are in a state of blessedness and rest.
          • The wicked dead are in a state of suffering and unrest.

          • The intermediate state following death is not the final state of believers.  [1]Heer, K. (2007). Luke: A Commentary for Bible Students (p. 312). Wesleyan Publishing House.

Having said that, there are problems with it, as we’ll see later as we continue with the sheep and the goats. I know, as I said, it’s a pretty common explanation. But hang in there, we’ll see the problem shortly.

In Jesus’ statement, where/what is “paradise”?

Not surprisingly, there isn’t agreement over what paradise means either. Here’s one source.

Paradise
(Gk. paradeisos) (23:43; 2 Cor. 12:4; Rev. 2:7) Strong’s #3857: This word literally means “garden” or “park.” It was used with such a meaning in the Greek Old Testament in Eccl. 2:5; Song 4:13. The Septuagint also used paradeisos for the Garden of Eden (see Gen. 2:8). In later Jewish thought, Paradise is the place of the righteous dead in Sheol. Jesus perhaps alluded to this idea in His story of Lazarus going to Abraham in 16:19–31. And when Jesus spoke to the thief on the Cross, He promised him that he would that day be with Him in Paradise (23:43). This again seems to indicate a pleasant place for the righteous among the dead. The promise of Paradise in Rev. 2:7 speaks of the restitution of an Edenic paradise, an everlasting home for believers (compare Gen. 2; Rev. 22).  [2]Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (1997). The Nelson Study Bible: New King James Version (Lk 23:43). T. Nelson Publishers.

In any case, we’re looking at people’s interpretations of what these things mean. Let’s continue with what Jesus said, and see how the two fit together. Are we, people, putting forth an interpretation of what Jesus said that creates problems? Or did Jesus’ own words create the apparent problems?

I submit, it’s our twisting of words, academically based analysis of those words, and an academic requirement to publish something/anything to meet so-called scholarly requirements. Instead, we should be focusing on learning how the various books in the Bible fit together. However, that’s not going to make splashy headlines or get books sold, is it?

With that in mind, let’s continue with the sheep and the goats.

Those on the right

No, not those on the political right. Or those who think they’re “right”, no matter the definition of right. It’s quite simple really. It’s the ones that are positioned to Jesus’ right side.

Mt 25:34 “Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. 35 For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, 36 I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

Remember, Jesus split the people up – right and left in the prior verses.

Mt 25:37 “Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? 38 When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? 39 When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’

This is also interesting. There’s a detail we may not have noticed. Jesus said, Then the righteous will answer him. Jesus did not say some of the righteous. Or even most of the righteous. He said “the”. Actually, Matthew used a Greek word that appears to mean all of the righteous.

That’s begs a question. Did every righteous person really say the things we just read? Well, actually, yes. Here’s why that’s true.

Ver. 37. Lord, when saw we Thee?—De Wette: “The language of modesty.” Olshausen: “The language of unconscious humility.” Meyer: “Actual declining of what was imputed, since they had never done to Christ Himself these services of love. The explanation is given in ver. 40.” Certainly, they have not yet any clear notion of the ideal Christ of the whole world. But this is connected with their humility; and it must not be lost sight of, since the opposite characteristic among the reprobate is exhibited as self-righteousness. [Origen: “It is from humility that they declare themselves unworthy of any praise for their good deeds, not that they are forgetful of what they have done.”]  [3]Lange, J. P., & Schaff, P. (2008). A commentary on the Holy Scriptures: Matthew (p. 449). Logos Bible Software.

I find this interpretation both fascinating, scary, and very realistic. We read/hear lots of things about how Christians are saved. And, of course, we assume we’re part of that group. That can lead us to be complacent. Maybe even arrogant.

We love to pay attention to Paul’s words about receiving crowns. But how much do we pay attention to his words about finishing the race? Even about not being arrogant? Do you remember what Paul wrote about ingrafted branches?

Ingrafted Branches

Ro 11:11 Again I ask: Did they stumble so as to fall beyond recovery? Not at all! Rather, because of their transgression, salvation has come to the Gentiles to make Israel envious. 12 But if their transgression means riches for the world, and their loss means riches for the Gentiles, how much greater riches will their fullness bring!

Ro 11:13 I am talking to you Gentiles. Inasmuch as I am the apostle to the Gentiles, I make much of my ministry 14 in the hope that I may somehow arouse my own people to envy and save some of them. 15 For if their rejection is the reconciliation of the world, what will their acceptance be but life from the dead? 16 If the part of the dough offered as firstfruits is holy, then the whole batch is holy; if the root is holy, so are the branches.

There’s lots of good stuff in there. Certainly for Paul. But also for us, as the Gentiles Paul write about. Good stuff that can lead to pride. And we know where pride goes, don’t we?

Ro 11:17 If some of the branches have been broken off, and you, though a wild olive shoot, have been grafted in among the others and now share in the nourishing sap from the olive root, 18 do not boast over those branches. If you do, consider this: You do not support the root, but the root supports you. 19 You will say then, “Branches were broken off so that I could be grafted in.” 20 Granted. But they were broken off because of unbelief, and you stand by faith. Do not be arrogant, but be afraid. 21 For if God did not spare the natural branches, he will not spare you either.

Ass I alluded to earlier, pride goes before the fall. In this case, the boasting and the arrogance lead to pride. The pride results in a branch being cut off. The branch the prideful person is on. And that branch, the prideful person, falls from the tree. In other words, the prideful person is separated from Jesus.

Therefore, Paul concluded with the warning below.

Ro 11:22 Consider therefore the kindness and sternness of God: sternness to those who fell, but kindness to you, provided that you continue in his kindness. Otherwise, you also will be cut off. 23 And if they do not persist in unbelief, they will be grafted in, for God is able to graft them in again. 24 After all, if you were cut out of an olive tree that is wild by nature, and contrary to nature were grafted into a cultivated olive tree, how much more readily will these, the natural branches, be grafted into their own olive tree!

I’ve often wondered, if we’re supposed to be saved and therefore we should live like we’re saved, why do I ding it so difficult to accept that I’ve been saved? Then I read something like this, and I begin to understand. Fear of arrogance. Fear of pride. And therefore, fear of being separated from Jesus. After all, it’s not like any of us does anything to earn salvation.

Jesus then explains the statement He made previously.

Mt 25:40 “The King will reply, ‘I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.’

This statement totally fits in with what we read earlier – But this is connected with their humility; and it must not be lost sight of, since the opposite characteristic among the reprobate is exhibited as self-righteousness.

Those on the left

Jesus then turns to address those on His left. Just in case a reminder is needed, this has nothing to do with our modern concept of the political left.

Mt 25:41 “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42 For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’

Mt 25:44 “They also will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?’

Mt 25:45 “He will reply, ‘I tell you the truth, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.’

All the explanations for those on the right fit here, except they’re completely polar opposites.

Jesus then concludes.

Mt 25:46 “Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.”

What did we see in the sheep and the goats?

We saw two groups of people. One was on their way to eternal life. The other was on their way to eternal punishment. OK, everyone who’s ever heard this before knows that.

However, how much attention have we paid to the questions from both groups? Disbelief? Certainly, surprise. Unexpected words. In other words, neither group seemed to really know what was coming. Given what we saw earlier about a common explanation of what happens after death, this is a real issue. It throws one really big monkey wrench into the mix.

What happens when we die – revisited

Here’s the point-by-point explanation that we looked at earlier. It’s something many use to tell what happens after doneath.


WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU DIE?

The Scripture basically uses three words to describe the state of the dead:

        1. Sheol, which refers to a state or place of the dead, sometimes with the element of misery;
        2. Hades, which refers to the invisible world of departed spirits; and
        3. Paradise, which refers to a park or garden.

The Scriptures teach us that:

        • At death the souls of the righteous go immediately into the presence of Christ and of God.
        • At death the souls of the wicked are banished from the presence of the Lord.

        • The souls of the departed exist in a state of consciousness.
          • The righteous dead are in a state of blessedness and rest.
          • The wicked dead are in a state of suffering and unrest.

          • The intermediate state following death is not the final state of believers.  [4]Heer, K. (2007). Luke: A Commentary for Bible Students (p. 312). Wesleyan Publishing House.

The Sheep and the Goats tells us that everyone appears before Jesus. By the way, there are other passages that say the same thing. Every knee will bow. The judgment scenarios. So it’s not like this is a one-off. This is what the Bible tells us.

So – if there is an intermediate place, it’s not one where the righteous know they’re the righteous ones and the evil know they’re the evil ones. If there was, I don’t know why there would be surprise about what happened in The Sheep and the Goats.

Further, at the conclusion, each group goes to their eternal destination.

Just in case the problem isn’t obvious, here are the details.

The Scriptures teach us that:

  • At death the souls of the righteous go immediately into the presence of Christ and of God.
  • At death the souls of the wicked are banished from the presence of the Lord.

This is not what Jesus said in The Sheep and the Goats. Rather, at some point, presumably death (because of the lack of surprise), everyone appears before Jesus. The righteous then go to their eternal destination. The unrighteous go to their eternal destination.

Therefore, what follows assumes that we go to Heaven for judgment after death, rather than waiting for the end of time.

What does this mean for the question – Do brain waves of a dying person show we’re in Heaven?

OK, follow carefully.

If the assumptions above are true, and I admit not everyone will agree with them, then everyone appears before Jesus at death. Everyone. Good, bad, or indifferent. Not only that, but they appear before Jesus in Heaven. Why do I say in Heaven? Because of:

Mt 25:31 “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit on his throne in heavenly glory. 32 All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate the people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 He will put the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.

Jesus is on His throne. In Heaven. Therefore, everyone, righteous or unrighteous, will be there. In Heaven.

Not only will they be there, but I believe the vast majority will think they’re going to stay there! Please check out The problem of “a Better Place” for an analysis of why I say that. Sadly, I believe the Bible makes this conclusion all too clearly.

Therefore, everyone will experience of overwhelming peace and calm. The peace and calmness of God. And yet, most people will only have that experience only briefly. And then …

The Narrow Door

Lk 13:22 Then Jesus went through the towns and villages, teaching as he made his way to Jerusalem. 23 Someone asked him, “Lord, are only a few people going to be saved?”
He said to them, 24 “Make every effort to enter through the narrow door, because many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able to. 25 Once the owner of the house gets up and closes the door, you will stand outside knocking and pleading, ‘Sir, open the door for us.’
“But he will answer, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from.’

Lk 13:26 “Then you will say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.’

Lk 13:27 “But he will reply, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from. Away from me, all you evildoers!’

Lk 13:28 “There will be weeping there, and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, but you yourselves thrown out. 29 People will come from east and west and north and south, and will take their places at the feast in the kingdom of God. 30 Indeed there are those who are last who will be first, and first who will be last.”

Yeah, after that brief feeling of overwhelming peace and calm, most of those present will remember Luke 13:28.

Lk 13:28 “There will be weeping there, and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, but you yourselves thrown out.

So please, don’t make the mistake of thinking what many people probably will. Namely – if everyone gets that peaceful, calm feeling when they die, then everyone must go to Heaven. I feel like the Bible tells us that yes, everyone will go to Heaven upon death. However, we go to be judged. Maybe that’s the believer’s judgment, where the destination is eternal like with Jesus in Heaven. Or. much more likely, it’s the white throne judgment, where those people move on to eternal suffering.


Image by Oleg Mityukhin from Pixabay


References

References
1, 4 Heer, K. (2007). Luke: A Commentary for Bible Students (p. 312). Wesleyan Publishing House.
2 Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (1997). The Nelson Study Bible: New King James Version (Lk 23:43). T. Nelson Publishers.
3 Lange, J. P., & Schaff, P. (2008). A commentary on the Holy Scriptures: Matthew (p. 449). Logos Bible Software.

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